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Opera society’s love story with a twist that promises to hit target

I was wondering if you could make any use of the attached photo in the paper at some point to help promote the Opera's show this year, Annie Get Your Gun?
Myself as the lead (Annie Oakley) and Merijn Scheppens (Frank Butler) had never held a gun before, so we decided with a few other cast members to go to Braidwood Clays for a morning's shooting to try to make our performances as a pair of sharpshooters a bit more convincing!

I was wondering if you could make any use of the attached photo in the paper at some point to help promote the Opera's show this year, Annie Get Your Gun? Myself as the lead (Annie Oakley) and Merijn Scheppens (Frank Butler) had never held a gun before, so we decided with a few other cast members to go to Braidwood Clays for a morning's shooting to try to make our performances as a pair of sharpshooters a bit more convincing!

AUDIENCES watching this year’s opera could be in for a surprise treat with classics such as There’s No Business Like Show business and Anything You Can Do reverbarating around the town hall.

That was the message from leading lady Janie Mallin, as the local operatic society gets set to stage hit musical Annie Get Your Gun. And with the fast-paced production gracing the town hall stage for the first time since 1959, townsfolk are being urged to go along and enjoy the
show.

Janie told the Hawick News: “There are lots of catchy numbers, and for anyone that perhaps thinks they don’t know anything about musicals or the tunes, they will be amazed by how many songs they recognise. In fact, Asda is currently using Anything You can Do in its latest advert.”

The story is a fictionalised version of the life of Annie Oakley (1860–1926), who joins Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show when it comes to town, after falling in love with its sharpshooter, Frank Butler. But Frank wants a more feminine woman, and the show tells the story of their romance and rivalry.

Janie went on: “It’s a love story with a difference, that actually has a modern theme based around women’s rights. It is a great part to play.”

However, the show was updated in 1999 to be more politically correct, with changes centred around Annie’s adoption by Native Americans, and the removal of a song and dance routine entitled I’m an Indian Too.

The Hawick cast members have been rehearsing since September, and with only three weeks to go until showtime, are busy putting the finishing touches to this year’s production.

Janie added: “I don’t know why the society hasn’t performed Annie Get Your Gun for more than 50 years, but we hope that audiences come along and enjoy a great show.”

The curtain rises from March 11-16 at 7.30pm and a Saturday matinee at 2.15pm.

Tickets from ILF Imaging in Sandbed.

 

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