A Scotsman’s journey to the Western Front in World War 1

PICTURE GARETH EASTON 07752 666522'FREE TO USE UNTIL 31ST DEC 2018.''PICTURED: 'PICTURED: OUTSIDE EDINBURGH'S USHER HALL. CAST AND MUSICIANS. '''As part of the WW100 Scotland Armistice centenary programme, critically acclaimed multimedia production Far, Far From Ypres, starring renowned Scots singers Barbara Dickson, Siobhann Miller and 24 other top folk musicians, will embark on a commemorative tour around Scotland, culminating with a performance in Edinburgh's Usher Hall on Sunday 11 November, a hundred years to the day since the end of World War One.'Singer Barbara Dickson takes part in the show in memory of her uncle David Dickson, who enlisted while underage and was killed in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. She forms part of a 26-strong cast, including Scottish folk scene favourites such as Siobhan Miller, Dick Gaughan, Ian McCalman, Iain Anderson, Professor Gary West, Stephen Quigg and Ian Bruce.
PICTURE GARETH EASTON 07752 666522'FREE TO USE UNTIL 31ST DEC 2018.''PICTURED: 'PICTURED: OUTSIDE EDINBURGH'S USHER HALL. CAST AND MUSICIANS. '''As part of the WW100 Scotland Armistice centenary programme, critically acclaimed multimedia production Far, Far From Ypres, starring renowned Scots singers Barbara Dickson, Siobhann Miller and 24 other top folk musicians, will embark on a commemorative tour around Scotland, culminating with a performance in Edinburgh's Usher Hall on Sunday 11 November, a hundred years to the day since the end of World War One.'Singer Barbara Dickson takes part in the show in memory of her uncle David Dickson, who enlisted while underage and was killed in the Battle of the Somme in 1916. She forms part of a 26-strong cast, including Scottish folk scene favourites such as Siobhan Miller, Dick Gaughan, Ian McCalman, Iain Anderson, Professor Gary West, Stephen Quigg and Ian Bruce.

What did your grandparents do in World War 1?

Far, far from Ypres, a multi-media performance uses the songs of the trenches and music halls to tell the story of the Scottish war effort.

Now on a commemorative tour of Scotland to mark the centenary of World War One, the production can be seen at Victoria Halls, Selkirk on Sunday, August 5.

Do you have a story of an ancestor that you would like to share?

Did great-granny work in a munitions factory or become a nurse? Was great grandad under age when he joined up?

If you would like a chance for their story to be included in the programme, email your ancestor’s tale (no more than 200 words) to ScottishCommemorationsPanel@gov.scot or by post to Mrs. Ann Wells, WW1 Team, Culture and Historic Environment Division, Area 2G South, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ. Stories must be submitted by July 13.

The show was devised, written and produced by Ian McCalman of folk group The McCalmans to highlight the unique insight the songs offer into the life of a soldier.

It shares the hope, suffering, endurance and fear associated with the war through the eyes of fictional, prototypical soldier, Jimmy MacDonald.

Like many young men, Jimmy is full of enthusiasm and joins up right away, however, when he is sent to the Flanders trenches he begins to experience the true horrors of war.

The songs of the war are seamlessly linked by narrator Iain Anderson and accompanied by a range of projected images, bringing to life Scotland’s contribution to the war effort both on the front line and at home. The contemporary music portrays the way attitudes to the war changed over the course of the conflict and provide a powerful context to a time greatly different from our own.

In addition, humorous extracts from a contemporary newspaper, The Wipers Time, produced by soldiers in the trenches and bitterly opposed by senior officers, conveys the cynicism of those at the receiving end of the war.

Performance starts at 7.30pm. Tickets cost £15 (£10 concession) and can be purchased at Scott’s Selkirk, 18 Market Place, by calling 01750 721382, or online at www.bit.ly/FFFYSelkirk.