Almost a third of Hawick walking festival hikes now sold out

Hawick is about to host the Scottish Borders Walking Festival for the fifth time altogether.
Hawick is about to host the Scottish Borders Walking Festival for the fifth time altogether.

Almost a third of the hikes making up this year’s Scottish Borders Walking Festival, the 24th, have sold out already even though it’s still over a month away.

Hawick is hosting this year’s week-long event, and 26 walks are being held in and around the Teviotdale town from Sunday, September 2, to Saturday, September 8.

Eight are already sold out, but places are still available on the other 18.

They include outings to Stobs Camp, home to up to 4,500 German prisoners during the First World War, and Hornshole, the scene of a skirmish between local youths and an English raiding party in 1514.

Walkers can also retrace the 13-mile return route of Hawick Common Riding’s Mosspaul rideout or try out a 12-mile circular walk taking in the hamlet of Craik and Borthwick Water.

Scottish Borders Council’s executive member for planning and environment, Leaderdale and Melrose councillor Tom Miers, said: “The popularity of the Scottish Borders Walking Festival continues in its 24th year, with almost a third of the walks already sold out.

“It is a fantastic event which sees a different Borders town host a week of walks every September, allowing ramblers from across the UK to enjoy the Borders’ landscape.

“There are walks for all abilities, ranging from 1.5 miles to 14.5 miles in distance.

“Despite a number of walks being fully booked, there is still a wide variety of routes on offer which take in attractions such as a former First World War camp, the historic common Riding, the Scottish-English border, remote communities and Hawick itself.”

This will be the fourth time Hawick has hosted the festival, first held in West Linton in 1995, in its own right, the three previous occasions being in 1996, 2003 and 2011. It also co-hosted the event with Jedburgh in 2009.

For details, visit www.borderswalking.com