Teries flock to Langholm’s big day

Cornet Ross Gibson and Selkirk Standard Bearer Greg McDougall at a sun-drenched Castleholm

Cornet Ross Gibson and Selkirk Standard Bearer Greg McDougall at a sun-drenched Castleholm

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Hundreds of Teries made the 22-mile trip south to Langholm last Friday to take part in what many describe as Hawick’s second Common-Riding.

Magnificent weather ensured a great day and Langholm Cornet Dale Irving, along with Right and Left-Hand Men Alasdair Cavers and Andrew Elliot, could not have wished for more. He carried out his duties and the standard in time-honoured style and tradition and was supported by a massive mounted turnout which was, as always, bolstered by a healthy contingent of Hawick horsemen and women.

The weather was scorching and as the mercury began to rise so did the anticipation of another memorable Common-Riding Friday in the Muckle Toon.

It’s an early start in Langholm on Common-Riding morn as the flute band parades the town from 5am and it’s a long day, too, as it culminates at the handing back of the flag at 9.30pm.

Unique to Langholm are the four emblems of the festival: the barley bannock, the salt herring, the spade, and a giant thistle. They are as much a part of proceedings as the annual fair-crying, which consists of the proclamation being read by a man standing on horseback.

Commenting this week on another memorable Friday at Langholm, Hawick Cornet Ross Gibson, who was among the followers, said: “The weather was fantastic. I just couldn’t believe the amount of Hawick folk who were there. It seemed like the whole town was there to support the cornet. It was amazing. Their Common-Riding is similar to ours in a lot of ways and lots of folk stayed on for the handing back of the flag.

“I’m sure the Lauder Cornet will get huge Hawick support this weekend, too.”